December 21, 2018
 
December 21, 2018
 
 
 
Note: AAOS’ offices will be closed Dec. 24, 2018, through Jan. 1, 2019. AAOS Headline News Now will not be published Dec. 24 through Dec. 31 and will resume Wednesday, Jan. 2, 2019.
 
 
 
Today’s Top Story

FDA Warns Clinics After 12 People Are Hospitalized Following Unapproved Stem Cell Injections

According to The New York Times, 12 people were hospitalized after receiving unapproved stem cell injections marketed by Genetech, Inc. The products were derived from umbilical cord blood and were injected into knees, shoulders, and spines to treat injuries and conditions like arthritis. These patients contracted infections (from E. coli and fecal bacteria) in the bloodstream or joints, and one patient was hospitalized for 58 days. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) sent a warning to Genetech for marketing these products without FDA approval and for significant deviations from current good tissue practice and current good manufacturing practice requirements. The agency also said it recently warned 20 clinics that offer unapproved stem cell treatments, although the names of the clinics have not been released.

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Read the FDA statement…

 
 
Other News

Study Compares Various Screw Configurations for TTO

In a study published online in Injury, researchers recommended the use of two parallel horizontal screws in tibial tubercle osteotomy (TTO). The authors analyzed six different screw configurations: two parallel horizontal screws placed at a 20 mm interval, two parallel horizontal screws placed at a 30 mm interval, two parallel upward screws, two parallel downward screws, two trapezoid screws, and two divergent screws. They assessed bone fragment displacement, contact forces on the fragment, and internal bone stress. Two parallel downward screws provided the lowest fragment displacement and gap opening. Maximum TTO displacement was slightly lower in the parallel downward screw configuration compared to parallel horizontal screws but only by 0.2 mm. Two upward screws yielded the highest fragment displacement and gap deformation between the fragment and tibia, as well as the highest level of stress of the osteotomized bone fragment.

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Study: Risk Factors Associated with Postoperative Hypothermia

A study published in the Dec. 15 edition of the Journal of the AAOS identified risk factors associated with postoperative hypothermia for orthopaedic surgery patients. Researchers reviewed 3,822 orthopaedic surgical procedures. Hypothermia was considered temperature lower than 36 degrees Celsius. Nearly three-quarters of patients (72.5 percent) experienced intraoperative hypothermia; postoperative hypothermia was observed in 8.3 percent of patients. Intraoperative hypothermia, lower preoperative temperature, female sex, lower body mass index, older age, adult reconstruction by specialty, and hip and pelvis procedures by anatomic region were all identified as risk factors for postoperative hypothermia.

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Study: Vascular Damage in Combination with Pelvic Fractures Is Associated with Increased Risk of Death

According to a retrospective study published online in BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, patients with vascular damage have increased mortality rates, and the risk increases in the presence of pelvic and extremity fractures. Of 3,689 patients from a single center, 64 had fracture-associated vascular injuries and were compared to a control group. In upper and lower limb and pelvic fracture patients, 7 percent sustained vascular damage. Survival rates for pelvic fracture and extremity fracture patients were 80 percent and 97 percent, respectively. This was comparable to nonvascular trauma patients. Patients with vascular damage were more likely to have initial anemia and disturbed coagulation tests, as well as require extensive preclinical fluid substitution.

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In ACA Battle, Value-based Care Models and Biosimilars Are Critical

While the fate of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) remains in limbo after a federal judge in Texas deemed it unconstitutional, members of the healthcare industry say this has no bearing on the future of value-based care models and efforts to lower drug prices. The ACA has reduced the national uninsured rate from 14 percent to about 8.8 percent; eliminating the law could leave millions without coverage. Rolling back the ACA would also strip the FDA of its power to approve biosimilars, which play a key role in lowering prescription drug prices.

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AAOS Now

Spine Study Identifies Predictors of Chronic Narcotic Use

In a recent study, researchers predicted—with 80 percent accuracy—which thoracolumbar spine surgery patients would still be taking narcotics two years postoperatively. Risk factors included patients with moderate to severe disability, high leg pain levels, high Pain Catastrophizing Scale helplessness scores, and low pain willingness at baseline. The results of the study were presented at the North American Spine Society Annual Meeting.

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Your AAOS

Young Investigator Initiative Grant Mentoring and Career Development Program

Sponsored by the United States Bone and Joint Initiative and Bone and Joint Canada, the Young Investigator Initiative Grant Mentoring and Career Development Program is open to junior faculty, senior fellows, or postdoctoral researchers nominated by their department or division chairs seeking to pursue a career in clinical or basic research. The program is also open to senior fellows or residents who are doing research and have a faculty appointment in place or confirmed. Basic and clinical investigators, with or without training awards, are invited to apply. Investigators selected to take part in the program attend two workshops, 12–18 months apart, and work with faculty between workshops to develop their grant applications. The spring 2019 workshop is scheduled to take place April 26–28, 2019, in Rosemont, Ill. The deadline for application submissions is Jan. 15, 2019.

Learn more and submit your application…

 
 

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